Job Description Grader FAQ

How is my grade calculated?

If a job description passes every component, it will receive an A. For each component that does not pass, the job description will lose a letter grade. Example: If a job description does not pass Sentiment and there is an instance of potential gender bias, that job description will receive a C.

How do I know if I did not pass a component?

Word counts and sentiments that fall outside the 20% to 80% range do not pass. A job description does not pass the insensitive words, gender bias, or racial bias components when the count of instances is greater than zero.

How do I improve my grade?

First, identify the component(s) that did not pass. If a job description did not pass on either the Sentiment or Word Count component, modify the job description so that the Sentiment or Word Count fall within the 20 – 80% range. These ranges are determined by a benchmark of jobs.

If a job description did not pass insensitive words, gender bias, or racial bias, identify the flagged text and evaluate if there is an opportunity to modify or remove the flagged content.

How does the Job Description Grader determine if a job description passes a component?

For Word Count and Sentiment, the Job Description Grader evaluates word counts and sentiment from a benchmark of similar job descriptions. If the submitted job description's word count is longer than 20% of similar jobs and shorter than 20% of similar jobs, then it passes. If the submitted job description's sentiment is more positive than 20% of similar jobs and less positive than 20% of similar jobs, then it passes.

If there is an identified instance of an insensitive word, gender bias, or race bias, then the job description will not pass the identified component.

A job description didn't receive an A, is that bad?

The tool helps users compare job descriptions and identify potential biases. Ultimately, the user should use professional judgement to decide if a revision or action is warranted.

What is readability?

A requirement for writing a good job description is that your audience can understand it. Job description readability is based on the simple premise that longer sentences and longer words, aka more syllables, are more complicated. The Flesch Kincaid grade level uses the average number of words per sentence and average syllables per word to determine readability according to a US grade level. Longer sentences and the more syllables indicate a more complex sentence, and thus higher grade level.

What is sentiment?

Great job descriptions provide readers a positive impression of your brand. Sentiment measures how “positive” or “negative” is your job description. Sentiment analysis does this by counting the occurrences of positive and negative words.

What is word count?

There’s an art to selecting the right words when writing a great job description.  How many of those great words to select, that’s where science can help. The Jobvite word count metric benchmarks the number of words in your job description against your industry. Using our word count benchmark, helps you understand if your description is a bit long or perhaps a bit short compared to other companies in your industry.

What are insensitive words?

Offensive language in your job description impacts your company’s brand and your efforts to promote diversity and inclusiveness. Jobvite scans your job description and flags insensitive and offensive language.

What is gender bias?

Gender bias in your job description can affect who applies, reduce the number of applicants, and negatively impact time to fill. Jobvite’s Gender Bias metric analyzes the words, skills, and requirements in your job description to identify whether the description tends to favor female or male job seekers. Highlighted words and phrases indicate skills and experiences that may restrict the diversity and inclusion of your applicant pool.

What is racial bias?

Racial bias in your job description can affect who applies, reduce the number of applicants, and negatively impact time to fill. Jobvite’s Racial Inclusion metric analyzes the words, skills, and requirements in your job description to identify whether the description tends to favor the skills and experiences found among one, or more, specific races. Highlighted words and phrases indicate skills and experiences that may restrict the diversity and inclusion of your applicant pool.

Why does an inclusive job description matter?

Jobvite research has found that more inclusive job descriptions are positively correlated with higher applicant counts and a shorter time to hire. In addition, independent research consistently finds more diverse and inclusive companies are more successful, i.e. profitable.

A biased job description can inadvertently favor a gender or race during applicant screening.  Consider the act of assessing how an applicant’s qualifications and experience align with a job description. If the requested skills and experiences are disproportionately held by a single gender or race, this can give subpopulation an unintended advantage, or disadvantage, when screening resumes.

What is an inclusive job description?

An inclusive job description is one where the skills and experiences requested in the job description are found at similar rates across all genders and races.

How is gender calculated?

Currently, Jobvite collects and infers gender on a binary level and therefore our gender bias metric is binary.  Jobvite realizes the importance of a broader and more inclusive definition and is monitoring the space for advancements and alternative approaches.

Why is my job description not inclusive?

Your job is flagged as having gender or racial bias. Why and what can I do about it? If the available workforce for your role is relatively diverse, then it’s possible the skills and experiences your requesting are introducing bias and restricting the inclusiveness of your job description.

If the available workforce for the role is not diverse, think specific language skill or gender dominated industry, then your job description may simply reflect the lack of diversity and inclusion for that specific role. In these situations, evaluate if all skills and experiences are necessary to complete the job. For example, consider removing requirements on previous management experience or consider replacing a highly specialized skill with one more broadly held.

Job Description Grader